Quote
"In most of the world’s densely packed urban areas, you can pick up fresh produce at a stall on the way home from work, or buy bread, meat, and staples at the corner shop across the street. But in sprawling metro Atlanta, where the model is mega markets surrounded by mega parking lots, very few of us have the option of a quick dash to the store."

Stranded in Atlanta’s Food Deserts : In a region that prides itself on celebrity chefs and lush farmers markets, half a million people live without access to something as basic as a grocery store | Rebecca Burns, Atlanta Magazine, 3/03/2014 (via atlurbanist)

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gardenup:

Food Deserts Leave Many Americans High and Dry
Where fresh foods are scarce, so is good health
FOOD DESERTS NYC: I used to live in a food desert in the South Bronx, NYC. It was easier to get a bacon, cheese, egg on a roll for breakfast from the local Indian deli than it was to find a supermarket with bacon, fresh eggs and real cheese. Fortunately I had the ability to grocery shop outside the neighborhood. But for thousands and thousands of people, especially those in the projects, that choice was not available. I read statements published by conservative or whatever politicians saying “food deserts don’t exist.” Well, they do. Look right in the backyard of New York City. 
Good piece from Scientific American below…
______________
Even within the borders of one of the world’s top agricultural countries, healthy food can be hard to come by. Many Americans reside in food deserts—communities where retailers offering fresh food are scarce but fast-food restaurants and convenience stores selling prepared foods can abound.
The top two maps at the right show the proximity of full-line grocers to two groups for whom healthy food is often difficult to procure: low-income households and those without access to a vehicle. Scientists are still exploring the links between food deserts and health by investigating how the nonavailability of fresh food may spur obesity, diabetes and other diet-related conditions. One 2006 study found an association between the presence of supermarkets and lower obesity rates. Convenience stores, on the other hand, were associated with higher rates.
“You always have to be careful about suggesting cause and effect,” says Mari Gallagher, whose Chicago consulting firm carries out case studies of local food environments. The relation between food and health is complex, and personal choice clearly plays a role. “But we do think that the environment, in a lot of different ways, matters,” Gallagher says. “You can’t choose healthy food if you don’t have access to it.”
Map linking food deserts to medical problems. 

gardenup:

Food Deserts Leave Many Americans High and Dry

Where fresh foods are scarce, so is good health

FOOD DESERTS NYC: I used to live in a food desert in the South Bronx, NYC. It was easier to get a bacon, cheese, egg on a roll for breakfast from the local Indian deli than it was to find a supermarket with bacon, fresh eggs and real cheese. Fortunately I had the ability to grocery shop outside the neighborhood. But for thousands and thousands of people, especially those in the projects, that choice was not available. I read statements published by conservative or whatever politicians saying “food deserts don’t exist.” Well, they do. Look right in the backyard of New York City. 

Good piece from Scientific American below…

______________

Even within the borders of one of the world’s top agricultural countries, healthy food can be hard to come by. Many Americans reside in food deserts—communities where retailers offering fresh food are scarce but fast-food restaurants and convenience stores selling prepared foods can abound.

The top two maps at the right show the proximity of full-line grocers to two groups for whom healthy food is often difficult to procure: low-income households and those without access to a vehicle. Scientists are still exploring the links between food deserts and health by investigating how the nonavailability of fresh food may spur obesity, diabetes and other diet-related conditions. One 2006 study found an association between the presence of supermarkets and lower obesity rates. Convenience stores, on the other hand, were associated with higher rates.

“You always have to be careful about suggesting cause and effect,” says Mari Gallagher, whose Chicago consulting firm carries out case studies of local food environments. The relation between food and health is complex, and personal choice clearly plays a role. “But we do think that the environment, in a lot of different ways, matters,” Gallagher says. “You can’t choose healthy food if you don’t have access to it.”

Map linking food deserts to medical problems. 

Quote
"There is no better example of racism in the 21st century, than the relationship of black people and access to healthy food. You know people think about racism as an individual act or prejudice or discrimination from one person to another, that’s not what it’s about. It’s about systems, it’s about structures, it’s about institutions; and the fact Black people live in neighborhoods where they can’t get access to healthy food choices and white people can get healthy food choices. That is classic textbook racism. You want to wipe out an entire generation of people when you wanna engage in the kind of 21st century genocide all you have to do is continue to do what we’re doing, which is deprive people of access to healthy food."

— Marc Lamont HIll, Soul Food Junkies dir. Byron Hurt (via goawaygora)

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90sbitchdotcom:

Untitled on We Heart It.
Quote
"

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

"

— One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’. (via crankyskirt)

(via anthrocentric)

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grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here
I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”
Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.
The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.
Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

 Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.
- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

grumpyfaceurn:

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Woking (ptcpl. vb.): Standing in the kitchen wondering what you came in here for.

- Douglas Adams, The Meaning of Liff

(via anthrocentric)

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saltysojourn:

Mayan Women reversing that white settler-colonial gaze.

saltysojourn:

Mayan Women reversing that white settler-colonial gaze.

(via fuckyeahmexico)

Tags: Mexico
Photo
insanity-and-vanity:

"If you are reading this, then this warning is for you. Every word you read of this useless fine print is another second off your life. Don’t you have other things to do? Is your life so empty that you honestly can’t think of a better way to spend these moments? Or are you so impressed with authority that you give respect and credence to all that claim it? Do you read everything you’re supposed to read? Do you think every thing you’re supposed to think? Buy what you’re told to want? Get out of your apartment. Meet a member of the opposite sex. Stop the excessive shopping and masturbation. Quit your job. Start a fight. Prove you’re alive. If you don’t claim your humanity, you will become a statistic. You have been warned."
Fight Club (1999)

insanity-and-vanity:

"If you are reading this, then this warning is for you. Every word you read of this useless fine print is another second off your life. Don’t you have other things to do? Is your life so empty that you honestly can’t think of a better way to spend these moments? Or are you so impressed with authority that you give respect and credence to all that claim it? Do you read everything you’re supposed to read? Do you think every thing you’re supposed to think? Buy what you’re told to want? Get out of your apartment. Meet a member of the opposite sex. Stop the excessive shopping and masturbation. Quit your job. Start a fight. Prove you’re alive. If you don’t claim your humanity, you will become a statistic. You have been warned."

Fight Club (1999)

(via suzies-vintage-suitcase)

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chefmemes:

I am going to date a chef…
www.ChefMemes.com
#FunnyChefMemes #chef #cheflife #food #foodies #funny #lol #love #dating #meme #9gag #lmao #lmfao (at http://ChefMemes.com)

chefmemes:

I am going to date a chef…


www.ChefMemes.com

#FunnyChefMemes #chef #cheflife #food #foodies #funny #lol #love #dating #meme #9gag #lmao #lmfao (at http://ChefMemes.com)

Tags: truth
Quote
"Ignoring your passion is slow suicide. Never ignore what your heart pumps for. Mold your career around your lifestyle not your lifestyle around your career."

— (via elauxe)

(Source: beyondfabric, via anthrostories)

Quote
"With great power comes the need to grow the f*ck up. You are accountable whether you like it or not."

— Indigo Williams (via thestufflifeismadeof)

(via anthrostories)

Photo
90sbitchdotcom:

♥Grunge-Aesthetic♥ on We Heart It.

90sbitchdotcom:

♥Grunge-Aesthetic♥ on We Heart It.

Photo
90sbitchdotcom:

. on We Heart It.
Tags: sailor moon
Photo
cartoonpolitics:

"Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction" .. (Blaise Pascale)

cartoonpolitics:

"Men never do evil so completely and cheerfully as when they do it from a religious conviction" .. (Blaise Pascale)

(Source: Los Angeles Times, via anthrostories)

Tags: religion
Audio

chansondeladieu:

Astor Piazzolla - Bandó

Tags: tango